PALM

SWEATING

 

 

To know more about this condition and its remedies, see the above links

Arun Prasad

 

banner

 

 

 

 

Hyperhidrosis - 'Alternative' Medicine

 

    In the experience of the author, many patients, disappointed by the treatment offered by their doctors, have tried different methods of alternative therapy including homoeopathy, massage, acupuncture and phytotherapeutic drugs, in almost all cases without noticeable improvement.

Hypnosis

    There are no systematic studies on this method. Few patiens have tried it, reporting poor results on palmar hyperhidrosis. Two cases of hypnotherapeutic treatment of psychogenic hyperhidrosis are reported. In both cases, organic aetiology could be excluded and conventional medical treatment modalities had no effect. In both cases, it was possible to modulate sweating in the trance state within less than a minute, thus supporting other reported cases of the effect of hypnotically induced modulation of autonomic responses. In the first case the psychological dynamics behind the physiological symptoms seemed unrelated to fundamental emotional and personal problems and relaxation and conditioning techniques in hypnosis had a positive effect in reducing the sweating to both objectively and subjectively socially acceptable standards. In the second case the hyperhidrosis was related to more fundamental personality problems and short term hypnotherapy proved ineffective in treating the condition.

Psychotherapy

    Very limited effect in the absolute majority of patients. Psychological problems are in most cases a consequence of hyperhidrosis, not the cause. Hence, psychiatric or psychopharmacologic therapy cannot cure this disorder.

At most it may help the patient to accept living with the problem.

Acupuncture

    In this method the root cause of your hand sweating is sought before any proper treatment is given. The same applies to ayurvedic practices, but although these are very good options to help you deal with your hand sweating problem, you'll want to make sure that you go to a properly trained professional of the field. Anything less can leave you with more problems than you desire.

The term acupuncture describes a family of procedures involving stimulation of anatomical points on the body by a variety of techniques; it stimulates points directly related to excessive sweating. American practices of acupuncture incorporate medical traditions from China, Japan, Korea, and other countries. The acupuncture technique that has been most studied scientifically involves penetrating the skin with thin, solid, metallic needles that are manipulated by the hands or by electrical stimulation.

Acupuncture needles are metallic, solid, and hair-thin. People experience hyperhydrosis acupuncture differently, but most feel little or no pain as the needles are inserted. Some people are energized by treatment, while others feel relaxed. Improper needle placement, movement of the patient, or defects in the needle can cause soreness and pain during treatment and is a prime example of why it’s important to seek treatment from a qualified hyperhidrosis acupuncture practitioner.

Each patient is custom-treated according to his or her specific and unique diagnosis. Acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine will rarely treat the symptom of sweating directly. There are, however, a few "symptomatic points" that are often used in combination for sweating.

    * LI-4 (Hegu), K-7(Fuliu)- For spontaneous sweating. Would be used in combination to regulate energy (Qi) throughout the body, clear dampness and calm the nervous system.
    * SI-3 (Houxi) – For night sweats.

Ayurvedic treatment

AMLA, proudly known as 'Indian Gooseberry' has been the key constituent of many Ayurvedic formulations. And nowadays, it has been accepted by almost all medical branches as a result of extensive research carried at Germany, England, India, and various other countries.

The importance of Amla has been ascertained from the experiments and experiences of ancient Rishi-Munis of India, namely Charak, Chyavan, Atreya, Kartik, Vrat Koumudi, and many others. Amla is considered one of the strongest rejunevatives (rasayana), particularly for blood, bones, liver, heart and skin. Amla is not only a wonderful antioxidant, but it has proven anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, anti-mutagenic, yeast inhibiting, nematicidal, anabolic, anti-hepatoxic, anti-hyperhidrosis, anti-inflammatory, anti-histaminic, anti-spasmodic, hypolipidemic, and hypotensive relieving properties. It also acts as an antacid and anti-tumorganic agent. In addition, it increases protein synthesis and thus useful in cases of hypoglycemia.

Ginger juice, Butterfly pea leaf juice (kakkanam in Tamil) and honey mixed in equal quantities and taken internally first thing in the morning is an excellent remedy for excessive sweating

For more information, you can see: http://ayurvedichomeremedies.blogspot.com/2006/11/some-simple-ayurvedic-home-remedies.html

 

Homeopathy

The following has been recommended at various homeopathic sites. (e.g.http://abchomeopathy.com/go.php)

Results are not available in a scientifically recorded form, so it is not possible to comment.

The homeopathic remedy that is most commonly used is Ipecacuanha.

For sweaty palms also used are Psoric Miasm and Psorinum .

If the sweaty feet are also smelly then that could be an indication for Silica.

Also described are

Antihidrosin (R32) ( Active ingredients: Belladonna 12X, Kali carbonicum 6X, Nitricum acidum 12X, Pilocarpus 4X, Salvia officinalis 30X, Sambuccus nigra 4X, Sanguinaria canadensis 6X, Sepia 30X, Veratrum album 12X, Inactive ingredients: 36 vol.-% alcohol, distilled water).

 

 

 

 

The author Dr Arun Prasad MS, FRCS .. has advised over 1500 patients suffering from hyperhidrosis.

He is a senior surgeon at Apollo Hospital, New Delhi and an expert in Minimal Access & Laparoscopic surgery, GI Surgery, VATS (Thoracoscopic) surgery. Also a teacher in Laparoscopic Surgery at Ethicon Institute of Surgical Education, Mumbai & Delhi.
Examiner for MRCS and tutor for Surgical Skills Course for the Royal College of Surgeons, Edinburgh & UK. He was a surgeon at Charing Cross Hospital and Medical School, London before returning to India. He belongs to the world's first generation of Laparoscopic Surgeons and is a pioneer in this field.

Click here for contact details or email to surgerytimes@gmail.com for free advise